Neighborhood Anchor — BVL Sales & Service

May 3, 2010

This article appeared last month in the Logan Square Chamber of Commerce Lamppost newsletter.  It’s a great fit for this blog; haven’t  you wondered about BVL?  The article is reprinted here with permission from the Logan Square Chamber of Commerce and the author, Mandy Guzman.

Guest post:  Mandy Guzman

Mandy Guzman received her bachelor’s degree from Bradley University and is now furthuring her education at the University of Chicago.  She has been teaching in a variety of capacities for the last nine years in both Spain and the Chicagoland area.  Mandy has been a Logan Square resident for the last two years.  She loves being involved in her community and spends Saturday mornings helping out at Nuestra Señora de las Américas in Logan Square.  If you’d like to contact Mandy, send her an email at brillmandy at hotmail dot-com.  


BVL Sales & Service on Milwaukee Ave.

Nineteen sixty-one was a year of many great events.  John F. Kennedy became president.  Ham the chimp rode a rocket into space.  The Peace Corps was established, West Side Story was released as a film and the future Princess Diana was born. Read the rest of this entry »

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History of the Morris B. Sachs building (Part II)

April 3, 2010

(Also see History of the Morris B. Sachs building [Part I].) tagGallagher   

Guest post: Katy Gallagher

Katy Gallagher has an M.S. in Historic Preservation from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has worked as a photo researcher for historic documentary programs at the History Channel and WTTW Channel 11 Chicago. She has also worked as an archaeological conservator for the National Park Service, and as a curatorial intern for the Glessner House Museum. Katy has been a Logan Square resident for the past three years and enjoys researching structures both grand and modest in the neighborhood.    


The architecture

At 2800-2808 N. Milwaukee Avenue, Leichenko & Esser created for building developer Sol H. Goldberg a six-story Art Deco style building encompassing a triangular lot.  Art Deco architecture is characterized by angular, linear composition, typically with a vertical emphasis, and often containing hard-edge, low relief ornamentation around door and window openings. The Morris B. Sachs flatiron building is a tremendous example of the Art Deco style (photo right*).   

The top four stories fronting Milwaukee and Diversey Avenues each contain seven sets of window units  — six sets of three-window units and one set of two-window units at the back — separated by vertical slabs of grey stone, the dominant building material. The slabs create a strong vertical visual effect. Atop each window are spandrels Read the rest of this entry »


History of the Morris B. Sachs building (Part I)

March 30, 2010

Late last year, I met Katy Gallagher, and learned of her passion for preservation.  I encouraged her to get involved with Logan Square Preservation (she did; at least she’s dipped her toe in) and asked if she would apply her passion and expertise to the benefit of Peopling Places readers (she has).   tagGallagher

Guest post:  Katy Gallagher

Katy Gallagher has an M.S. in Historic Preservation from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has worked as a photo researcher for historic documentary programs at the History Channel and WTTW Channel 11 Chicago. She has also worked as an archaeological conservator for the National Park Service, and as a curatorial intern for the Glessner House Museum. Katy has been a Logan Square resident for the past three years and enjoys researching structures both grand and modest in the neighborhood.


Milwaukee-Diversey-Kimball Landmark District

Designated a Landmark District in 2004 by the Commission on Chicago Landmarks, the Milwaukee-Diversey-Kimball district (photo right), developed in the 1920s, is a rare surviving historic commercial district in Chicago, especially impressive because four of its original six-corners streetscape remain intact.  

The landmark designation identifies seven structures located between 2767 and 2808 N. Milwaukee Avenue as a “significant and visually distinctive group of 1920s commercial buildings.” (Chicago Department of Planning & Development. Landmark Designation Report Milwaukee-Diversey-Kimball District. Chicago, 2004, p. 3. )  These buildings contain abundant ornamentation made of terra cotta, brick and limestone and are terrific examples of the Classical Revival and Art Deco styles popular at the Read the rest of this entry »


Winter diversions in Logan Square: John Alexander Logan Birthday Film Fest

February 3, 2009

logan-birthday-film-fest-marquee

In celebration of our neighborhood namesake’s birthday, the Logan Square Chamber of Commerce is hosting the John Alexander Logan Birthday Film Fest at the Logan Theater at
2626 N. Milwaukee Avenue on Saturday and Sunday, February 7 and 8.

Illinois native Logan served in the Mexican-American War, the Civil War, in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, and created Memorial Day. The film festival will honor both his political and military service.

Saturday will feature the 1939 Frank Capra/Jimmy Stewart classic, “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” with the memorable filibuster scene, as well as “Glory,” the 1989 Civil War film starring Matthew Broderick and Denzel Washington beginning at 1:55 p.m. Read the rest of this entry »


“Historic” Milwaukee Avenue

June 24, 2008

Comfort and Image of Milwaukee Avenue: in its history

The Project for Public Spaces identifies “Comfort and Image” as one of the key attributes of a great place (see diagram below or larger pdf diagram available to download). Much of what I’ve been writing about Milwaukee Avenue, and will continue to write about, has to do with
PPS place diagramits comfort and image, or lack thereof at the present. While I’ve so far pointed out mostly the negatives or why it is not comfortable and does not have a good image, Milwaukee Avenue does have a historic quality (as does Logan Square as a whole) that contributes positively to its comfort and image and potential as a great place. Just ask the folks at Preservation magazine who just featured Logan Square in Read the rest of this entry »